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Religion & Legends                   70,000 BC
Africa
Southwest Asia
Egypt
Indus Valley
China
Europe
South America
Mesoamerica
North America
Other

Africa

 

Southwest Asia

The "accursation of Earth" - a new ice age ­ begins. Regressive types of Man roam Earth. (146)

Egypt

Bu Wizzer is what the ancient Khemitians originally called their land. Bu means land, and wizzer is the correct Khemitian title for "god," which the Greeks named Osiris, also called Osar or Ausar. Bu Wizzer also translates as "the land of Osiris." It was the land from Abu Rawash in the north to Dahshur in the south, bordered by the Libyan Desert to the west and Helwan to the east, and incorporated Giza, Sakkara, Dahshur, Zawiyet el Aryan, Abusir, and Abu Ghurab (site of an ancient ruined obelisk). Ancient oral tradition claims it was one of the earliest settled areas of Khemit, going back to 70,000 BC. There has been much speculation around the mythical figure of Osiris. However, according to ancient tradition, the Wizzer (Osiris) was considered to be one of Khemit's early leaders. Whether he was mythical or an actual man, he became the model for all later kings. He introduced agriculture, architecture in stonework, engineering, law, spirituality, science, ethics, and all the other elements of modern civilization to the people. (70)

The ancient oral tradition puts forth a meaning that generally agrees with Reymond's translation. Zep tepi corresponds to a time when the people (the Sesh) achieved a new level of consciousness. It began over sixty-five thousand years ago. Mehler believes this time refers to an era between twenty thousand and sixty thousand years ago, when the Khemitians attained a higher level of consciousness and knowledge. It allowed them to build their great structures and carve their tunnels. In essence, it allowed them to create their civilization. Later, all this formed the basis of their creation mythology. (70)

Indus Valley

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China

 

Europe

 

Emil Bachler, between 1903 and 1927, excavated three caves in the high Alps... The first and third were about seven thousand feet and the second over eight thousand above sea level, and they could not have been entered during the period of the Wurm glaciation. Hence their remains have been judged to belong to the interglacial period (Riss-Wurm) at the latest; which is to say, not later than 75,000 BC. And what was found? Charcoal, flints of pre-Mousterian style, flagstone flooring, benches, work tables, and altars for the ritual of the bear - the earliest altars of any kind yet found, or known of, anywhere in the world. (128)

South America

 

Mesoamerica

 

North America

 

Other

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