HUMANPAST.NET

Religion & Legends                   12,000 BC
Africa
Southwest Asia
Egypt
Indus Valley
China
Europe
South America
Mesoamerica
North America
Other

Africa

 Not only southwest Europe but "Libya [North Africa to the Greeks] up to the borders of Egypt" was said to be under Atlantic control before the war (Timaeus 25). (115)

Southwest Asia

 Type B [blood] seems most likely to have occurred just after the cataclysm of 11,500 years ago, as Annunaki rescued humans and created Annunaki-human city-states. Historically, Jews and other non-Arab peoples in the Middle East have a higher-than-average Type-B percentage than the generally Type-O Arabic population around them. Perhaps blood type, like other physical features, was a marker of identification for human groups related to particular Annunaki regimes. Blood samples played a role in distinguishing Israelites from Egyptians when an angel was sent to kill the oldest sons of Egyptian families (see biblical story in Exodus). (113)

Egypt

Using murals, sculptures, and engravings from Uxmal and Chichen Itza, Le Plongeon re-created and narrated a history of several key Mayan rulers and their link to other cultures. The story, according to Le Plongeon, occurred 11,500 years ago. His history appeared fully developed in his book Sacred Mysteries Among the Maya and Quiches, and told of the love between Queen Moo and Prince Coh, and of his death by the hand of his jealous brother Aac. According to Le Plongeon's interpretation, during a period of civil unrest after the death of Prince Coh, Queen Moo was forced to flee to Egypt and on her arrival was recognized as a long-lost sister. The story was substantiated, Le Plongeon felt, not only by the wealth of artifacts recovered during excavations from Uxmal and Chichen Itza, but also by what he interpreted as the cremated remains of Prince Coh's heart. Le Plongeon tells us it was the story that was graphically illustrated on the walls of the Upper Temple of the Jaguars and in the story of the Troano Manuscript. Le Plongeon asserts that, according to their own history and legend, during prehistoric times, the Mayans entered the Yucatan from the west led by Itzamna, their earliest mentioned leader and hero. Along a pathway mysteriously opened through the waters, they came from the Far East beyond the ocean. (70)

A second migration occurred sometime later, during the second century AD, led by Kukulcan, a miraculous priest and teacher who became the founder of the Mayan kingdom and civilization. Of special interest to Le Plongeon was a story contained in the Troano Manuscript that told of a dreadful natural cataclysm, most likely an earthquake. Several pages at the beginning of the second part were dedicated to recounting the "awful phenomena" that occurred during the cataclysm that submerged ten countries. Among them was the large island call the "land of Mu," situated among the strangely crooked line of islands historically known as the West Indies. To the Maya, it was the "land of the scorpion." Le Plongeon was astonished and gratified to find an account of the events written during the lives of the characters he found in the ruins. Their history, described in the mural paintings, was also told in the legends and sculptures still adorning the walls of their palaces and temples. He was also pleased to learn that these ancient celebrities had already been converted, at the time of the Troano Manuscript, into gods of the elements. To the new Maya, these beings became the agents who produced the terrible earthquakes that violently shook the "lands of the west," as told in the narrative of the Akab-cib, and laid the island to rest beneath the waves of the Atlantic Ocean. With the deciphering of the Troano Manuscript, the story of Queen Moo continued. Sailing out from the Yucatan, she sought refuge in the land of the scorpion (the West Indies), but discovered that Mu, the heart of the land, had vanished. With no alternatives, she continued her voyage eastward and succeeded in reaching Egypt. Le Plongeon substantiates this by implying that she is mentioned on Egyptian monuments and in papyri, always referred to as Queen Mau (Moo). To the Egyptians, she is better known as the goddess Isis, wearing vestments of various colors that imitate feather work, similar to the plumage of the macaw, after which she was named in the Mayan language. (70)

A very interesting statue crowned Prince Coh's mausoleum, a dying leopard with a human head. To Le Plongeon, it was a "veritable sphinx," and possibly the prototype of the mysterious Egyptian Sphinx. This Mayan sphinx, like the leopard in the sculptures, has three deep holes in its back, symbolic of the wounds inflicted by his brother Aac. This brave Mayan warrior, whose enemies could not kill in a fair fight, was treacherously slain by his cowardly brother, just as Osiris, in Egypt, was murdered by his brother Seth, and for the same motive--jealousy. In Egyptian history, Osiris comes to us as a myth. However, according to Le Plongeon, Prince Coh, the beloved Ozil, was a tangible reality--the remains of his charred heart were found, as well as the weapons that caused his death. In Sacred Mysteries Among the Maya and Quiches, Le Plongeon endeavors to show, from the identity of their history and from that of their names and totems, that the Egyptians worshipped Seb, Nut, and their children (Osiris, Seth, Aroeris, Isis, and Nike) as gods. Le Plongeon argues that these were the same personages as the Royal Mayan family: King Canchi; his wife, Zoc; and their five children, Cay, Aac, Coh, Moo, and Nike. (70)

Indus Valley

  …Tamil traditions that speak of three episodes of flooding in the millennia preceding the supposed foundation date of the First Sangam: The first great deluge took place in 16,000 BC...The second one occurred in 14,058 BC when parts of Kumari Kandam went under the sea. The third one happened in 9564 BC when a large part of Kumari Kandam was submerged. There are curious echoes here of the yuga system at the heart of the Dwarka story, on the one hand, and of the Vedic notion of the pralaya - the global cataclysm that recurs at the end of each world age - on the other: In both cases we must envisage an antediluvian civilization of high spiritual and artistic achievement and a group of sages - the Seven Rishis in the case of the Vedas, the members of the' Academy' in the case of the Tamil texts - who gather to serve the interests of knowledge and to provide an archive or repository for poetic and religious compositions. In both cases a cataclysm in the form of a global flood intervenes, swallowing up huge areas of land and destroying the antediluvian civilization. In both cases survivors repromulgate the ancient knowledge in the new age - which is portrayed as a decline from the age before - forming a new group of Seven Rishis or a new Sangam suitable to that age. (124)

China

 

Europe

 

South America

 

Mesoamerica 

Using murals, sculptures, and engravings from Uxmal and Chichen Itza, Le Plongeon re-created and narrated a history of several key Mayan rulers and their link to other cultures. The story, according to Le Plongeon, occurred 11,500 years ago. His history appeared fully developed in his book Sacred Mysteries Among the Maya and Quiches, and told of the love between Queen Moo and Prince Coh, and of his death by the hand of his jealous brother Aac. According to Le Plongeon's interpretation, during a period of civil unrest after the death of Prince Coh, Queen Moo was forced to flee to Egypt and on her arrival was recognized as a long-lost sister. The story was substantiated, Le Plongeon felt, not only by the wealth of artifacts recovered during excavations from Uxmal and Chichen Itza, but also by what he interpreted as the cremated remains of Prince Coh's heart. Le Plongeon tells us it was the story that was graphically illustrated on the walls of the Upper Temple of the Jaguars and in the story of the Troano Manuscript. Le Plongeon asserts that, according to their own history and legend, during prehistoric times, the Mayans entered the Yucatan from the west led by Itzamna, their earliest mentioned leader and hero. Along a pathway mysteriously opened through the waters, they came from the Far East beyond the ocean. (70)

A second migration occurred sometime later, during the second century AD, led by Kukulcan, a miraculous priest and teacher who became the founder of the Mayan kingdom and civilization. Of special interest to Le Plongeon was a story contained in the Troano Manuscript that told of a dreadful natural cataclysm, most likely an earthquake. Several pages at the beginning of the second part were dedicated to recounting the "awful phenomena" that occurred during the cataclysm that submerged ten countries. Among them was the large island call the "land of Mu," situated among the strangely crooked line of islands historically known as the West Indies. To the Maya, it was the "land of the scorpion." Le Plongeon was astonished and gratified to find an account of the events written during the lives of the characters he found in the ruins. Their history, described in the mural paintings, was also told in the legends and sculptures still adorning the walls of their palaces and temples. He was also pleased to learn that these ancient celebrities had already been converted, at the time of the Troano Manuscript, into gods of the elements. To the new Maya, these beings became the agents who produced the terrible earthquakes that violently shook the "lands of the west," as told in the narrative of the Akab-cib, and laid the island to rest beneath the waves of the Atlantic Ocean. With the deciphering of the Troano Manuscript, the story of Queen Moo continued. Sailing out from the Yucatan, she sought refuge in the land of the scorpion (the West Indies), but discovered that Mu, the heart of the land, had vanished. With no alternatives, she continued her voyage eastward and succeeded in reaching Egypt. Le Plongeon substantiates this by implying that she is mentioned on Egyptian monuments and in papyri, always referred to as Queen Mau (Moo). To the Egyptians, she is better known as the goddess Isis, wearing vestments of various colors that imitate feather work, similar to the plumage of the macaw, after which she was named in the Mayan language. (70)

A very interesting statue crowned Prince Coh's mausoleum, a dying leopard with a human head. To Le Plongeon, it was a "veritable sphinx," and possibly the prototype of the mysterious Egyptian Sphinx. This Mayan sphinx, like the leopard in the sculptures, has three deep holes in its back, symbolic of the wounds inflicted by his brother Aac. This brave Mayan warrior, whose enemies could not kill in a fair fight, was treacherously slain by his cowardly brother, just as Osiris, in Egypt, was murdered by his brother Seth, and for the same motive--jealousy. In Egyptian history, Osiris comes to us as a myth. However, according to Le Plongeon, Prince Coh, the beloved Ozil, was a tangible reality--the remains of his charred heart were found, as well as the weapons that caused his death. In Sacred Mysteries Among the Maya and Quiches, Le Plongeon endeavors to show, from the identity of their history and from that of their names and totems, that the Egyptians worshipped Seb, Nut, and their children (Osiris, Seth, Aroeris, Isis, and Nike) as gods. Le Plongeon argues that these were the same personages as the Royal Mayan family: King Canchi; his wife, Zoc; and their five children, Cay, Aac, Coh, Moo, and Nike. (70)

North America

 

Other

 The Australian Aborigones offer a wonderful subject for meditations on the nature of humanity. Consider: these people lived in what may have been nearly complete isolation for more than 40,000 years in an ecologically diverse continent, and when first encountered by Europeans in the 17th century, their technology hardly approached the sophistication of the Neanderthals: just simple stone tools and rudimentary wooden implements; and yet they evolved a kinship system and cosmology that most graduate students in anthropology have struggled to comprehend in all its complexity--and probably never do.(24)