HUMANPAST.NET

Language                  10,000 BC
Africa
Southwest Asia
Egypt
Indus Valley
China
Europe
South America
Mesoamerica
North America
Other

In General

 Although we have no direct evidence of the hypothesized world-language's content or structure, some scholars believe that single language first divided 10 to 15 thousand years ago. Linguists arrive at such dates from their calculations of the time it would have taken for languages to evolve to their current level of diversity. Selection by the experts of the 10 to 15 thousand-year time span for the initial language division straddles the well-documented, worldwide Cataclysm of 11,500 years ago. That leaves us with the question of whether divergences in a basic language occurred before the Cataclysm or after. (113)

Among other claims, Johanna Nichols of the University of California at Berkeley says she can track languages back beyond the 6,000-year cutoff point - in fact, way beyond. Nichols interprets this to mean that there was a great wave of migration beginning in southeastern Asia about 11,000 years ago and spreading south to New Guinea, north through Asia, and from there eastward to North America, where it traveled down the west coast of the New World. (130)

Africa

 

Southwest Asia

 

Egypt

 

Indus Valley

 

China

 

Europe

 

But as unlikely as the notion of an Upper Paleolithic script once seemed (the Sumerians are supposed to have invented writing in the third millennium BC), a recent study of the abstract signs accompanying the cave art suggests that these enigmatic marks were just that. A pair of American scholars has found counterparts to the Paleolithic signs in many of the earliest written languages of Europe and Asia. (115)

South America

 

Mesoamerica

 William Niven, a Scottish engineer and amateur archaeologist, had been excavating near a village called Amantia, north of Mexico City, when he found hundreds of tablets apparently written in the Mayan script. From their depth, Niven judged them to be more than 12,000 years old. Contemporary Mayan scholars were unable to decipher the script, but when Niven showed some of the tablets to Churchward, the ex-lancer claimed to be able to read it. During his time in India, he explained, he had formed a friendship with a Hindu priest who, when he learned that the young British officer was interested in archaeology, spent two years teaching him to read inscriptions that, he claimed, were written in Naacal, which was the original tongue of mankind and also the language of the lost continent of Mu. And now Niven had demonstrated the truth of another assertion: that the priesthood of Mu had sent emissaries to Central America to teach their secret knowledge and to prepare a place of refuge in the event of the destruction of their own civilization. This had finally come about…about 50,000 years ago. 123)

North America

 

Other