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Early farmers around the world converged in finding, through domestication and agriculture, four key ingredients to the village-farming way of life: they all found (1)a source for textiles, (2) a productive, high car bohydrate, main crop plant, (3) an edible oil for cooking, and (4) a reliable source of animal protein. The initial northern Chinese solutions to these problems were hemp for textiles...(49)

Africa

 

Southwest Asia

 

Egypt

 This same identification connecting the Colchian people with the Egyptian and referring specifically to their unexcelled skill in weaving runs through nearly every ancient author's work. Similarity of ancient Peruvian textiles with those of Egypt long have puzzled those who have examined both weavings. The National Archaeological Museum in Lima, particularly, has magnificent examples of textiles taken from Paracas, comparable only with the finest ever produced in Egypt. We, today, cannot duplicate that which was so expertly done here on the altiplano anciently. Both Herodotus and Strabo related that Colchian weaving stemmed from Egyptian and was done in a manner entirely unknown to the rest of the world. And so it was. (135)

Indus Valley

 Records

China

 

Europe

 Montezuma wore a feathered headdress, as of course did the latter-day Red Indians. Feathers had also been a favoured type of headdress in Minoan Crete. Purple was the priestly colour both in the New World and the Old. Montezuma was carried in a litter, as were dignitaries in the Old world. Montezuma used a throne and a sceptre, as did most royal rulers from Egyptian times onwards. He wore a tiara, which was a royal fashion of the Old World. (135)

South America

Finally, as zoos often discover to their dismay, captive animals that are docile and healthy may nevertheless refuse to breed in cages. You yourself wouldn't want to carry out a lengthy courtship and copulate under the watchful eyes of others; many animals don't want to either. This problem of getting captive animals to breed has derailed persistent attempts to domesticate some potentially very valuable animals. For example, the finest wool in the world comes from the vicuna, a small camel species native to the Andes. But neither the Incas nor modern ranchers have ever been able to domesticate it, and wool must still be obtained by capturing wild vicunas. (114)

This same identification connecting the Colchian people with the Egyptian and referring specifically to their unexcelled skill in weaving runs through nearly every ancient author's work. Similarity of ancient Peruvian textiles with those of Egypt long have puzzled those who have examined both weavings. The National Archaeological Museum in Lima, particularly, has magnificent examples of textiles taken from Paracas, comparable only with the finest ever produced in Egypt. We, today, cannot duplicate that which was so expertly done here on the altiplano anciently. Both Herodotus and Strabo related that Colchian weaving stemmed from Egyptian and was done in a manner entirely unknown to the rest of the world. And so it was. (135)

Mesoamerica

Montezuma wore a feathered headdress, as of course did the latter-day Red Indians. Feathers had also been a favoured type of headdress in Minoan Crete. Purple was the priestly colour both in the New World and the Old. Montezuma was carried in a litter, as were dignitaries in the Old world. Montezuma used a throne and a sceptre, as did most royal rulers from Egyptian times onwards. He wore a tiara, which was a royal fashion of the Old World. (135)

North America

...the

Other

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